Tag: healthier

Six Rules For Eating Wisely by Michael Pollan

Can anyone use some #Positive #News? We unearthed this Gem written in 2006 by one of our favorite Authors about Six Rules For Eating Wisely. Please Share this with Everyone You Care About. Courtesy of #TIMEMagazine. #GetFitChallenge #BBQRESCUESFoundationInc

http://michaelpollan.com/articles-archive/six-rules-for-eating-wisely/

Six Rules For Eating Wisely

Once upon a time Americans had a culture of food to guide us through the increasingly treacherous landscape of food choices: fat vs. carbs, organic vs. conventional, vegetarian vs. carnivorous. Culture in this case is just a fancy way of saying “your mom.” She taught us what to eat, when to eat it, how much of it to eat, even the order in which to eat it. But Mom’s influence over the dinner menu has proved no match for the $36 billion in food-marketing dollars ($10 billion directed to kids alone) designed to get us to eat more, eat all manner of dubious neofoods, and create entire new eating occasions, such as in the car. Some food culture.

I’ve spent the past five years exploring this daunting food landscape, following the industrial food chain from the Happy Meal back to the not-so-happy feedlots in Kansas and cornfields in Iowa where it begins and tracing the organic food chain back to the farms. My aim was simply to figure out what–as a nutritional, ethical, political and environmental matter–I should eat. Along the way, I’ve collected a few rules of thumb that may be useful in navigating what I call the Omnivore’s Dilemma.

Don’t eat anything your great-great-great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food. Imagine how baffled your ancestors would be in a modern supermarket: the epoxy-like tubes of Go-Gurt, the preternaturally fresh Twinkies, the vaguely pharmaceutical Vitamin Water. Those aren’t foods, quite; they’re food products. History suggests you might want to wait a few decades or so before adding such novelties to your diet, the substitution of margarine for butter being the classic case in point. My mother used to predict “they” would eventually discover that butter was better for you. She was right: the trans-fatty margarine is killing us. Eat food, not food products.

Avoid foods containing high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). It’s not just in cereals and soft drinks but also in ketchup and bologna, baked goods, soups and salad dressings. Though HFCS was not part of the human diet until 1975, each of us now consumes more than 40 lbs. a year, some 200 calories a day. Is HFCS any worse for you than sugar? Probably not, but by avoiding it you’ll avoid thousands of empty calories and perhaps even more important, cut out highly processed foods–the ones that contain the most sugar, fat and salt. Besides, what chef uses high-fructose corn syrup? Not one. It’s found only in the pantry of the food scientist, and that’s not who you want cooking your meals.

Spend more, eat less. Americans are as addicted to cheap food as we are to cheap oil. We spend only 9.7% of our income on food, a smaller share than any other nation. Is it a coincidence we spend a larger percentage than any other on health care (16%)? All this “cheap food” is making us fat and sick. It’s also bad for the health of the environment. The higher the quality of the food you eat, the more nutritious it is and the less of it you’ll need to feel satisfied.

Pay no heed to nutritional science or the health claims on packages. It was science that told us margarine made from trans fats is better for us than butter made from cow’s milk. The more I learn about the science of nutrition, the less certain I am that we’ve learned anything important about food that our ancestors didn’t know. Consider that the healthiest foods in the supermarket–the fresh produce–are the ones that don’t make FDA-approved health claims, which typically festoon the packages of the most highly processed foods. When Whole Grain Lucky Charms show up in the cereal aisle, it’s time to stop paying attention to health claims.

Shop at the farmers’ market. You’ll begin to eat foods in season, when they are at the peak of their nutritional value and flavor, and you’ll cook, because you won’t find anything processed or microwavable. You’ll also be supporting farmers in your community, helping defend the countryside from sprawl, saving oil by eating food produced nearby and teaching your children that a carrot is a root, not a machine-lathed orange bullet that comes in a plastic bag. A lot more is going on at the farmers’ market than the exchange of money for food.

How you eat is as important as what you eat. Americans are fixated on nutrients, good and bad, while the French and Italians focus on the whole eating experience. The lesson of the “French paradox” is you can eat all kinds of supposedly toxic substances (triple crème cheese, foie gras) as long as you follow your culture’s (i.e., mother’s) rules: eat moderate portions, don’t go for seconds or snacks between meals, never eat alone. But perhaps most important, eat with pleasure, because eating with anxiety leads to poor digestion and bingeing. There is no French paradox, really, only an American paradox: a notably unhealthy people obsessed with the idea of eating healthily. So, relax. Eat Food. And savor it.

BBQ RESCUES! Smoky Grilled Potato Salad Recipe (plus Video)

By Chef Mick Brown

#potatosalad #grilledpotatosalad
Skin-on Grilled Potato Salad with chopped Fresh Parsley, Grilled Bell Peppers and Onions offers more Nutrients than the typical Boiled Potato version; Mayo and Mustard are Optional.

Potato Salad seems to be a staple on the Menus of many cultures, from all across America, to Asia and throughout Europe. It is great paired with Grilled Foods like German Sausages, as a side dish with Korean BBQ and of course with American Barbecued Chicken and Ribs. Though Potatoes are not considered the most nutritious vegetables, they are known to be be much healthier served skin-on. Another advantage to Grilling vs. Boiling is they tend to retain more nutrients.

I first thought of doing Grilled Potato Salad while in the process of experimenting with Grilled Potato “Fries”. Having a few extra disks of crispy, perfectly grilled potatoes, I diced them and shared them with a restaurant neighbor who added a delicious dressing and fresh Herbs. Adding natural Wood Smoke takes this Grilled Salad to a new even more delicious dimension. I recently served the dish at a Birthday Catering in the park for a very special 1 Year Old and 130 of her closest Family and Friends. We caught some of it on video.

GRILLED POTATO SALAD

Ingredients (for 6 Servings)

4-6 Medium to Large Red Potatoes

1/2 Green, Red and Yellow Bell Peppers (or any combination of 2)

1 Large Red or White Onion

1 Cup Italian, Greek, or Green Goddess Dressing (or Your Favorite Oil/Vinegar based Dressing)

1/2 Cup Chopped Fresh Parsley

1/4 Cup BBQ Rub ( see simple Home Rub Recipes)

Salt/Pepper to Taste

2-4 Tbsp Mayo and Mustard to Taste (optional)

Directions

1. Get your Gas or Charcoal Grill Smoking before you start Grilling. See: SMOKING USING WOOD CHIPS AND CHUNKS.

2. Wash and Slice Potatoes 1”-1 1/2 inches thick, lengthwise leaving skin on (may remove any blemishes).

3. Marinate Potatoes evenly in wet mixture of 1/2 Cup Dressing, 1/4 Cup Parsley and BBQ Dry Rub (click for Recipe). May reserve 1 Tbsp Parsley for Garish and a sprig to decorate on the side.

4. Grill Potatoes on Medium parts of Grill, flipping after 10 Minutes, checking if some pieces are cooking faster than others. Keep Smoke going on throughout.

5. Slice Onion 1” inch Thick. Cut Peppers lengthwise in Half, seed and soak all in Leftover Marinade from Potatoes.

6. Grill Peppers and Onions up to 10 Minutes per side, or until tender.

7. Once all veggies are cool enough to handle. chop into 1”- 1 1/2” inch Dice. Toss in bowl with up to 1/2 Cup Dressing, Mayo and Mustard to taste. Add more Rub and Salt/Pepper to taste.

6. For serving, sprinkle plated Potato Salad with more Parsley and BBQ Rub. May add a sprig of Parsley on side for decoration. Enjoy.

SEE YOUTUBE VIDEO- BBQ RESCUES! Smoky Grilled Potato Salad

PHOTOS (Video Stills)

#grilledpotoatoes #grilledpota
Slice Red Potatoes 1″ to 1 1/2″ for even Grilling. We catered 130 people, you won’t need so many Potatoes…
#grillingpotatoes #grilledpotatoes
Spread Potatoes evenly over Grill, top shelf OK. Leave space in between for circulation.
#chefmickbrown #grilledpotatoes #grillingpotatoes
Grill Potatoes evenly, for 10 Minutes per side. If a few get a bit crispy, even better.
#grilledpotatosalad #tasteebqgrillingco
Tray of Grilled Potato Salad, garnished with Parsley ready to serve for Catering.

Chef Mick Brown is a Food Blogger/Purveyor based in Los Angeles, with over 30 years BBQ and Grilling experience. Aside from Catering, his passions are creating Easy Grilling Recipes and searching for the World’s Best Flavors. General Manager of Tastee BQ Grilling Co. and the new California Gold BBQ Rubs. He is also author of web serial blog “The Adventures of Tastee BQ.” and BBQ Catering Confidential. He recently appeared on the Food Network for “Grill or Be Grilled” a special BBQ Edition of Cutthroat Kitchen where he won the Champion Title of Grill Master. Episode is available on iTunes. Email- Mick@BBQRescues.com 

LINKS

BBQ RESCUES! website https://bbqrescues.com/

BBQ RESCUES! TV  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4q6YWRcMgdsH_Lnw5XgqZA

BBQ RESCUES! Podcasts on iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/al/podcast/bbq-rescues!/id1030435189?mt=2

BBQ RESCUES! on Blog Talk Radio- http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bbqrescues

Video: BBQ RESCUES! TV with Chef Mick Brown Smoky Grilled Potato Salad- https://youtu.be/_bHYcG9flYE